Don’t Buy Fewer, Just Buy Smaller

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Nelson Classics. Approximately 6″X4″ covered in what I believe is called “Rexette” (but I have not been able to confirm what this faux blue leather binding is), I have always been drawn to this series they do look well.

I have about 50 titles in this series in stock mainly priced between £2.50 and £5.00, fortunately some of the titles are still classed as classics, though I yet to find a fan of Mrs Craik.

 
Craik Mrs –  John Halifax Gentleman
Dumas Alexandre –  The Three Musketeers
Bronte Emily  – Wuthering Heights
Gilbert Henry  – Robin Hood
Ainsworth Harrison – The Tower of London
Stowe Harriet Beecher  – Uncle Tom’s Cabin

No need to buy fewer books; Just buy smaller ones.

Well before paperbacks became the norm every publisher (or it seems like every publisher) had their own “Pocket Books”. Produced with differing quality and obviously different prices, though I am not convinced that any were of a low enough price to reach a massive audience.

 

 

 

Elizabeth Taylor famously bought Richard Burton a set of Everyman, knocking on for a thousand books. The choice of “Oxford World Classic” titles I suspect was influenced by a degree of nepotism, though that shouldn’t be surprising as “Oxbridge” thrives and is built on nepotism.

I am particularly drawn to the “Nelson” blue faux leather series. I have well over a thousand titles though from various publishers and some very “attractive” sets, nearly all are well bound and some have very striking dust jackets.

 

Just to prove the Daily Express haven’t always published rubbish.

Printed in 1933 by Daily Express Publications this series of “classics” present a set of very good looking books. A real bargain at £2.50, or £10.OO for the set.

img_20190118_154936Titles featured;

Oliver Goldsmith – The Vicar of Wakefield & She Stoops to Conquer

Wilkie Collins – The Woman in White

RD Blackmore – Lorna Doone

Alexander Dumas – The Three Musketeers

Charles Reade – The Cloister and the Hearth

George Elliot – The Mill on the Floss

W M Thackeray – Vanity Fair

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